Why are SweetRoots containers better than solid plastic containers?

In solid plastic containers, roots grow until they hit the plastic inner wall. They then begin to circle around that plastic container wall, accumulating their mass in the area of the container most susceptible to the negative effects of high heat, extreme cold, and dry soil. Having the root systems of plants developing around the plastic container walls can quickly stunt plant growth when unexpected temperature fluctuations happen or an irrigation emitter fails. 

With SweetRoots containers, root branches that reach the container wall stop growing in length and start growing multiple branches along their length. When secondary root branches reach the container wall the process repeats. The growth is exponential, and soon the root system becomes extremely dense and concentrated in the center of the container. When plants can tolerate unexpected temperature extremes and irrigation issues, farmers have a significantly higher probability of saving the plant before growth is stunted. SweetRoots containers keep inventory loss to a minimum.


Why are SweetRoots containers superior
to felt containers?

Felt containers work with a process called root-trapping which is not the same as air pruning. While the method is similar, air pruning is a faster process that concentrates the density of the root system in the middle of the container where conditions are more ideal, with increased stability from environmental change. Felt containers concentrate the roots around the inner walls of the pot where they become ingrained/trapped in the container side wall. While this does promote some root branching, these roots get exposed to temperature changes and can get heavily damaged or ripped when the container is lifted by its side walls.


What is a root bound plant?

A root bound plant is simply a plant that has outgrown its container. The roots become thick and, in many cases, begin to circle around the container wall. This creates a tangled mess of roots, stunting growth and creating stress by depriving the plant of water and nutrients. Due to the growth pattern of root systems grown in SweetRoots containers, the roots develop into a dense fibrous mesh that are always pointing outwards and never circle around the inside of the container. This growth pattern allows the plant to stay in the same size container for longer, when compared to solid plastic containers, without slowing growth rates.


What is root/air pruning?

Root branches growing in SweetRoots containers reach the container wall and stop growing in length when they sense the dry air, hence the term “air-pruning”. When that primary branch stops growing in length, the root system is stimulated to start growing multiple secondary branches along the original length. When the secondary root branches reach the container wall the process repeats. The growth is exponential, and soon the root system becomes extremely dense and concentrated in the center of the container.